A 21-year-old man from Orwell, Ohio has been charged with OVI after an incident on a May 14 incident, but the driver wasn't necessarily running what we'd all consider a vehicle.

According to the Ashtabula County Sheriff’s Office, deputies were called to Hague Road to help Orwell police with a "reckless operator" driving a horse-drawn buggy down the road - on the wrong side.

Police and deputies got in front of the buggy, but the driver, identified in an Ashtabula County sheriff's office report as Nathan Miller, did not stop.

“We got a drunk Amish guy passed out in a buggy,” a deputy could be heard saying on body camera video, according to Cleveland 19.

Police pursued the buggy for a short distance before it eventually stopped.

As deputies tried to gain control of the horse, it lunged forward and crashed the buggy into the cruiser.

Miller was treated for his injuries and was arrested and charged with operating a vehicle under the influence.

Funerals Held For Amish Girls Murdered In Pennsylvania Schoolhou
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Just back in February, there was a story about another Amish man who was arrested for Driving Under the Influence and was also cited for careless and reckless driving

While this older incident took place in Jefferson County, Pennsylvania, it brings up the conversation about drunk driving that we should have.

In every western movie I've watched, the hero - if and when injured - trusts his noble steed to carry him to safety. I take the old westerns as fact, and know that a dude with a bullet hole in his liver is much more incapacitated than these guys in the buggies.

So are we really doing the right thing by charging the buggy operators with drunk driving, or should we be having a conversation about the horse he told to take him home?

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Read more at Cleveland 19 

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