A 23-year-old man is sitting behind bars and has been charged with evading despite his efforts to get away from law enforcement, according to ABC 13.

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On February 4th, Allen Lynch Jr. was pulled over on I-10 in Houston, Texas by a DPS Trooper for an expired temporary tag on his car.

Lynch told the trooper that he just got the Dodge Charger that day. When the trooper asked for Lynch's driver license and to step out of the car, Lynch sped off.

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According to the five-and-a-half-minute video Lynch shared to social media of the full interaction, Lynch drove at a high rate of speed, weaving in and out of traffic. You can see him take an exit before some kind of a wreck is heard.

"So y'all, I got away," Lynch said in the video. "I got away. Round of applause. Round of applause."

Lynch put together the video and showed the aftermath to his Charger from his escape. The wheels of the car were damaged a bit during his escape, which would likely explain the wreck sound.

"You think I'm going to make their job easier?" Lynch asked. "Their job is to catch us. Our job is to run away."

Since all the evidence they needed to nab Lynch was shared right there in his video, police arrested him on February 8th after failing to do "his job" of running away.

When he shot the video of the incident, Lynch said it wasn't the first time they'd tried to pull him over.

"That's like the third time they tried me, bro," Lynch says in the video. "They keep trying me, bro. I don't know what they want from me that they're not going to get. They have to catch me first."

Check out more of his video here:

"The pursuit was approximately 4 miles with speeds over 120 mph on the highway and close to 100 mph on the surface roads," the charging document reads.

Read more at ABC 13

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