We all have our designated parking spaces in our neighborhoods. Nobody discusses them, but you know you shouldn't park by the telephone pole because that's where Tom's kid parks his truck. You don't disrupt the order of the neighborhood's parking agreement, and one neighborhood in Florida is the prime example of why you shouldn't.

According to a police report, 57-year-old Andre Abrams was arrested on November 30th after a dispute with a neighbor lead to a flamethrower being brought out and used.

Terrace allegedly armed himself with the flamethrower, came out of his residence and began spraying the flamethrower in the direction of a neighbor's vehicle. According to the arrest report, the flamethrower was an XM42 Lite, which can spray flames up to 20 feet.

Check out this video of someone trying out an XM42 Lite:

The XM42 Lite is available for purchase from X Products, a website that appears to sell Flamethrowers, Can Cannons, and firearms accessories.

At time of the incident, three juveniles were sitting in the car when they saw Abrams walking toward them with the flamethrower and start spraying it at the car. Witnesses reported that the flames came within five feet of the car and they were afraid of being burned, or the car catching on fire.

Alachua County Sheriff
Alachua County Sheriff
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After being read his Miranda rights, Abrams reportedly stated that he has had an ongoing problem with the parking, and admitted to spraying the flamethrower. He denied targeting the vehicles, telling the officers if he "wanted to burn the car, he would have."

The arrest report also mentioned there have been multiple reports of Abram using the flamethrower in his neighborhood.

Abrams was released later on bail of $45,000 - each of the three aggravated assault charges valued at $15,000.

Read more at Alachua Chronicle

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